Biography

Léorah Freeman, M.D., Ph.D is an Assistant Professor of Neurology in the Multiple Sclerosis Research Group and the Magnetic Resonance Image Analysis Center at the McGovern Medical School.

Dr. Freeman received her Doctorate of Medicine as well as her Doctorate of Philosophy in Neurosciences from Université Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris, France. Following a residency in Neurology, she completed a 2-year clinical fellowship specializing in the diagnosis, management and treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neuroimmunological disorders of the central nervous system at La Pitié Salpêtrière hospital in Paris. Dr. Freeman went on to complete her post-doctoral research training in Neuroimaging at the Brain and Spine Institute in Paris, France and subsequently in the Department of Neurology at McGovern Medical School in Houston, Texas. Her research has been funded by the French National Institute of Health (INSERM) as well as the National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS).

Dr. Freeman’s current research focuses on the application of advanced imaging techniques to explore and delineate the mechanisms driving disability progression in MS. She is also deeply committed to the development of new technology to bring state-of-the-art MRI analysis to the bedside.

 

Education

Medical Degree
Faculté de Médecine La Pitié Salpêtrière, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France
Masters
Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris VI), Paris, France
Doctorate
Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris VI), Paris, France
Residency
Neurology, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France
Fellowship
Faculté de Médecine La Pitié Salpêtrière, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France

Areas of Interests

Clinical Interests

Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO)
Immune-mediated Neurological Disorders


Research Interests

Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis
Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration in MS

Research Information

  • Grey matter perfusion and its relationship to tissue damage in MS
  • Subtraction imaging for accurate quantification of disease activity
  • Development of an automated neuroimaging pipeline to bring MRI biomarkers to routine management in MS