The Texas Medical Association Foundation recognizes the Medical School’s TMA chapter with a grant for Frontera de Salud.
The Texas Medical Association Foundation recognizes the Medical School’s TMA chapter with a grant for Frontera de Salud.

The Texas Medical Association Foundation recently gave a $3,000 award to Frontera de Salud, a community outreach projected led by Medical School students.

Frontera de Salud is a community health project with the goal of reducing the burden of chronic disease, specifically hypertension and diabetes, and promoting healthy living amongst the residents of Cameron County, in South Texas. Using a community health worker model, Medical School students partner with County Commissioner Sofia Benavides and the Cameron County Health Department to reach out to residents.

During four weekends during the year, medical students provide health screenings, taking blood pressure and fasting glucose and provide information about chronic disease, nutrition, and weight loss more than 200-400 people per year.

“The project is fully run by medical students, and we feel very privileged to have been welcomed into the Brownsville community,” said Courtney Olsen, fourth-year MD/PhD student.

Current student leaders of the project are Kemly Philip fourth-year MD/PhD student; David Savage fifth- year MD/PhD student; Anna Li first-year medical student; Ogechukwu Obiano first-year medical student; and Olsen. Dr. LaTanya Love, assistant dean of diversity and inclusion, is the faculty sponsor.

The TMA Foundation is a 501 (c) (3) organization committed to connecting the charitable concerns of physicians with the people of Texas. TMAF-funded initiatives enable physicians and their families to give back to their community and take a visible leadership role toward improving the health of all Texans.