Dr. Eric Thomas, associate dean for healthcare quality, is among the featured speakers sponsored by the AMA grant.
Dr. Eric Thomas, associate dean for healthcare quality, is among the featured speakers sponsored by the AMA grant.

The UTHealth Medical School’s chapter of the American Medical Association recently applied for and received a section involvement grant for the continuation of a quality improvement lecture series from the American Medical Association.

“Leading Healthcare in Two Directions: Quality Up, Cost Down” is a weekly lecture series that features physicians from the Texas Medical Center who present the quality improvement projects that they lead. The goal of the course is to excite the first- and second-year Medical School class with advancements in quality improvement and connect students interested in quality improvement with faculty and physicians who are leaders in the field.

“I am extremely excited to continue the lecture series,” said Blake Henchcliffe, second-year medical student and chapter president of HCMS/TMA/AMA. “The topics of this series are critical to medicine, and the series provides an early opportunity for students to learn about these important subjects.”

The blue book lecture series addresses the six domains of healthcare quality as put forth by the Institute of Medicine: safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient, and equitable. Speakers are asked to present a specific quality improvement project that addressed one of these six areas of healthcare quality.

Lecture series speakers will include Dr. Bela Patel, assistant dean of Healthcare Quality and director of the Division of Critical Care Medicine; Dr. Trudy Krause, associate professor at the UTHealth School of Public Health; Dr. Eric Thomas, professor of medicine and director of the UT-MHH Center for Healthcare Quality and Safety; Dr. Michael Shabot, Chief Medical Officer of the Memorial Hermann Healthcare System; Dr. Lilian Kao, associate professor of surgery and member for the Center for Clinical Research and Evidence-Based Medicine; and Dr. Gretchen Gemeinhardt, associate professor at the UTHealth School of Public Health.

-Darla Brown, Office of Communications, Medical School