Walter Koroshetz, M.D.
Walter Koroshetz, M.D.

Walter Koroshetz, M.D., director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), will be the keynote speaker at The Stroke Institute Inaugural Symposium at McGovern Medical School. Koroshetz, who oversees 1,141 scientists, physician-scientists and research administrators, will speak about that institute’s priorities on stroke.

“This symposium will address the latest breakthroughs in stroke research and treatment and announce the Institute for Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease at McGovern Medical School, a multi-school, multi-disciplinary hub for research, training and best practices in acute stroke treatments, stroke prevention, stroke recovery, population health and health services,” said Sean I. Savitz, M.D., professor and the Frank M. Yatsu Chair in Neurology at McGovern Medical School and a member of Memorial Hermann Mischer Neuroscience.

The educational event directed by Savitz, who will present the goals and mission of the new Institute for Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease at McGovern Medical School, will be held 8:30 a.m. – noon, Saturday, Feb. 18, followed by a lunch and research forum highlighting the most exciting areas in stroke research and treatment at the Fayez S. Sarofim Research Building at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 1825 Pressler Street. Validated parking is available at University Center Tower, 7000 Fannin. To register for the free event and complimentary lunch or for more information, contact Tracy Underwood at Tracy.n.underwood@uth.tmc.edu

The presentations will appeal to various health care professionals, including physicians, medical students, residents, fellows, research investigators, individuals in public health, nursing, rehabilitation, and anyone interested in recent stroke research and treatments.

Highlights of the symposium include:

  • Symposium opening by Michael Blackburn, Ph.D., executive vice president and chief academic officer at UTHealth, co-dean of The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston
  • Differences in stroke between women and men: Louise McCullough, M.D., Roy M. and Phyllis Gough Huffington Distinguished Chair of Neurology and chair of the Department of Neurology at McGovern Medical School; and co-director of Memorial Hermann Mischer Neuroscience Institute in the Texas Medical Center and chief of neurology at Memorial Hermann-TMC.
  • University of Texas System brain health initiative: Tom Jacobs, Ph.D. , associate vice chancellor for federal relations at The University of Texas System
  • Mobile stroke units: James Grotta, M.D., director of stroke research at the Clinical Institute for Research and Innovation at Memorial Hermann-TMC.
  • Developing the next generation of stroke treatments: Jaroslaw Aronowski, Ph.D., professor and Roy M. and Phyllis Gough Huffington Chair in Neurology and vice-chair for research, Department of Neurology, McGovern Medical School.
  • The genetics of cerebral aneurysms: Dong Kim, M.D., professor and chair, Vivian L. Smith Department of Neurosurgery at McGovern Medical School and director of Memorial Hermann Mischer Neuroscience Institute in the Texas Medical Center.
  • Personalized medicine in cerebrovascular disease: Eric Boerwinkle, Ph.D., Dean & M. David Low Chair in Public Health & Kozmetsky Family Chair in Human Genetics, UTHealth School of Public Health.

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) is the nation’s leading funder of research on the brain and nervous system. The mission of NINDS is to seek fundamental knowledge about the brain and nervous system and to use that knowledge to reduce the burden of neurological disease.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation’s medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases.