ADAPT-2 Treatment Study for Methamphetamine Use Disorder

(NCT03078075)

Methamphetamine is a stimulant like cocaine, but not actually cocaine. Both drugs increase levels of dopamine in the brain; however they do so via different mechanisms. Methamphetamine has a much longer duration of action, meaning that more of the drug remains in the brain longer, leading to prolonged stimulant effects. The CNRA is part of a national multi-site clinical research study of a promising new medication combination treatment for methamphetamine addiction.

We are currently recruiting:

  • Adults, ages 18-65
  • Use methamphetamines and who want to quit or reduce their use

Contact:
ms.CNRAResearch@uth.tmc.edu
713-486-2635


Role of the Orexin Receptor System in Stress, Sleep and Cocaine Use

(NCT02785406)

Stress, sleep dysregulation, and drug craving are critical functions that increase addiction vulnerability. Building on evidence that the orexin system regulates these functions, the current study investigates whether pharmacotherapies targeting the orexinergic system have potential for addiction treatment and relapse prevention. Participants undergo laboratory evaluation, including measurement of eye-movements in the presence of drug-related cues. State of the art wearable activity/sleep monitors are used to collect data and prompt medication taking over the course of the study.

We are currently recruiting research volunteers with cocaine dependence.

Contact:
ms.CNRAResearch@uth.tmc.edu
713-500-DRUG (3784)


Developing Adaptive Interventions for Cocaine Cessation and Relapse Prevention

(NCT02896712)

No single treatment is appropriate for everyone; rather, treatments need to be adjusted based on patient characteristics and response in order to be maximally effective. The CNRA has launched a new clinical trial designed to test adaptive treatment interventions (the interventions may change based on how the participant is doing) for cocaine cessation and relapse prevention. Participants may receive motivational incentives, individual therapy, and medication, combined in a way that targets their treatment needs and progress toward recovery.

We are currently recruiting:

  • Adults, ages 18-60
  • Suffer from cocaine addiction

Contact:
ms.CNRAResearch@uth.tmc.edu
713-500-DRUG (3784)


Targeting Anhedonia in Cocaine Use Disorder

(NCT02773212)

Anhedonia, or the lack of interest or pleasure in non-drug rewards, is considered a key mechanism of action (“target”) underlying addiction. Treatment directed at changing or improving this target may lead to clinical benefit. The CNRA has launched a new clinical trial to determine whether medication treatment can improve brain reward deficits and, in doing so, reduce anhedonia and facilitate achievement of abstinence. Participants receive motivational incentives, brief therapy, and medication in this 4 week trial.

We are currently recruiting:

  • Adults, ages 18-60
  • Suffer from cocaine addiction

Contact:
ms.CNRAResearch@uth.tmc.edu
713-500-DRUG (3784)


E-cigarettes to Promote Smoking Reduction Among Individuals with Mental Illness

(NCT02918630)

The prevalence of tobacco smoking among schizophrenics is 80-90% and associated with increased risk of smoking-related diseases and death. Smoking reduction has health benefits on its own and also increases the likelihood that smokers may initiate and succeed in quitting smoking in the future. The CNRA is conducting a pilot feasibility study on the use of e-cigarettes in conjunction with nicotine-replacement therapy to promote smoking reduction among individuals with schizophrenia. Participants will receive nicotine patches and may receive an e-cigarette during this 5-week trial.

We are currently recruiting:

  • Adults, ages 18-65
  • Who smoke cigarettes and have been diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder.

Contact:
ms.CNRAResearch@uth.tmc.edu
713-500-DRUG (3784)