Soares named Chancellor’s Health Fellow

Jair C. Soares, M.D., Ph.D., chair of McGovern Medical School Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Pat R. Rutherford Chair in Psychiatry, has been named a 2016 Chancellor’s Health Fellow for The University of Texas System Office of Health Affairs.


Research spotlights caregivers of bipolar patients

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) researchers are studying how strategies, such as group psychoeducation or mobile health technology, can help improve the well-being of those who care for bipolar patients.


Grant funds addiction research

Margaret Wardle, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, has received a Mentored Clinical Scientist Research Career Development Award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).


Grant to establish GIFT network

The New York Life Foundation has awarded a three-year, $1.55 million grant to The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) Trauma and Grief (TAG) Center for Youth to establish the GIFT (Grief-Informed Foundations of Treatment) network, a multi-site practice-research network that will refine, evaluate, and validate assessment tools for grieving children to identify the appropriate support or intervention needed.


Psychiatry hosts World Bipolar Day program

Recent innovations in treatment including medications and therapies will be presented at a World Bipolar Day event sponsored by the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.


PTSD, trauma focus of Psychiatry Update

McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) invites all medical professionals from across the country to join the annual UTHealth Psychiatry Update. Sponsored by the school’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, this year’s event focus is “Innovations in Trauma Research and Practice: Exploring PTSD and Related Outcomes Across the Lifespan.”


Study: Sadness-induced inflammation in the body linked to comorbid diseases

Feeling sad can alter levels of stress-related opioids in the brain and increase levels of inflammatory proteins in the blood that are linked to increased risk of comorbid diseases including heart disease, stroke, and metabolic syndrome, according to a study by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).